CDC Announces 2600% Increase in Babesia in Wisconsin

CDC Announces 2600% Increase in Babesia in Wisconsin

What is Babesia?

Babesiosis, or “Babesia” is an Apicomplexan parasite that infects red blood cells causing a disease which is spread by the black-legged tick Ixodes scapularis. This tick also spreads Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, and recently the more immediately deadly Powassan virus. Babesia microti, is a relative of the parasite that causes malaria.

What are the Symptoms?

Some people will have no symptoms when infected, while in others,  the illness can be fatal. It can take up to two weeks for symptoms to show in someone who is infected.

Symptoms of babesiosis include:

  • fatigue
  • weakness
  • nausea
  • diarrhea
  • high fever
  • kidney damage
  • heart failure
  • night sweats

Babesia in Wisconsin Facts

  • 96% of cases reported between April and October
  • Between 2001 and 2015, there were 430 cases reported in Wisconsin.
  • Out of 430 cases in Wisconsin, 158, or 65% of the people were hospitalized, and three people died as a result of the infection.
  • Wisconsin did not begin screening its blood supply for the babesiosis parasite until 2016.
  • Before Wisconsin started screening for Babesia in the blood supply, three cases of the infection spread through transfusion with contaminated blood.

 For Full Story Please Read:
CDC Reports 2600% Increase in Tick-Borne Babesiosis Infections in Wisconsin in 12 Years

Lyme Disease in Wisconsin

Babesia





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One thought on “CDC Announces 2600% Increase in Babesia in Wisconsin”

  1. It should be mandatory for ALL BLOOD SUPPLY to be tested for Lyme & Babs. With so many people undiagnosed & the high risk that it presents for “needed blood” we all could be doing more harm than good. When someone has surgery their body is already stressed, if blood is needed for replacement due to loss, other illnesses or diseases and those patients are receiving tainted parasitic blood it is another unrecognized pandemic. Yes, it cost money, yes it can save lives & thus the donor can receive treatment.

    I personally believe blood testing for babesiosis should be “offered” annually to all patients by including it in the annual health physical & screenings and children’s well check ups.

    ONGOING & MANDATORY “Continuing Education” is imperative for ALL health professionals thus educating and protecting others.

    We should not delay in testing our blood supply, doing so is negligent & giving a death sentence.

    [Wisconsin did not begin screening its blood supply for the babesiosis parasite until 2016.
    Before Wisconsin started screening for Babesia in the blood supply, three cases of the infection spread through transfusion with contaminated blood].

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