LDN (Low Dose Naltrexone)

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Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) for Lyme Disease

Naltrexone is an FDA-approved opiate antagonist that has traditionally been used to wean alcoholics and opioid dependent drug users off the substances, but, in a low dose (referred to as “low dose naltrexone” which is approximately 1/10 the dose used for drug/alcohol rehabilitation), can boost the immune system — helping those with HIV/AIDS, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and central nervous system disorders. Amazingly, LDN can reduce inflammation and oxidative stress, modulate the immune system, and even inhibit cancer cell proliferation.

Dr Mercola reports that, “The latest research in Experimental Biology and Medicine just confirmed that LDN does in fact target the opioid growth factor (OGF)/opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) pathway to inhibit cell proliferation. Previous research by professor Ian S. Zagon of The Pennsylvania State University, who also conducted the Experimental Biology and Medicine study, found that OGF regulates the growth of cancer cells, and all cancer cells use the OGF-OGFr pathway in growth regulation. It is through this mechanism that LDN is thought to exert its profound inhibitory effect on cancer growth.

Further, LDN also works with your body’s immune system through its interactions with your body’s endorphins. Though most commonly referenced in relation to you mood, endorphins also play a role in pain relief, immune system regulation, growth of cells and angiogenesis (the growth of blood vessels that feed a tumor).

Typically, LDN is taken at bedtime, which blocks your opioid receptors, as well as the reception of endorphins, for a few hours in the middle of the night. This is believed to up-regulate vital elements of your immune system by increasing your body’s production of metenkephalin and endorphins (your natural opioids), hence improving your immune function.”

Rice’s Pharmacy reports that, “Accumulating evidence suggests that Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN; 3.0-4.5 mg orally, taken once daily at bedtime) can promote health supporting immune-modulation which may reduce various cancer-causing and inflammatory autoimmune processes. LDN may also play a role in healing and repair of tissues, as well as promoting stress resilience, social bonding, and emotional well-being; and helping with psychiatric problems such as autism and depression.

Chronic Lyme disease is often the result of not only infections with borrelial organisms (the most well-known culprit) but also multiple co-infections with other bacteria and parasites. These multiple co-infections may suppress the immune system or may cause a nonspecific stimulation of the immune system, leading to inflammation, pain, and immune dysfunction.”

Relevant Articles:

LDN for Lyme Disease and MS

Books about LDN:

Back To:

Lyme Disease Protocols, and Healing Aids





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