Molecular detection of persistent Borrelia burgdorferi in a man with dermatomyositis.

Clin Exp Rheumatol. 1992 Jul-Aug;10,4:387-90. Molecular detection of persistent Borrelia burgdorferi in a man with dermatomyositis. Fraser DD, Kong LI, Miller FW.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

A 40-year-old white man with a several year history of various immunologic disorders, including anti-Jo-1 autoantibody positive dermatomyositis, developed clinical Lyme disease after being biten by a tick. The patient was treated with oral tetracycline and his initial symptoms resolved; however, he suffered an exacerbation of his muscle disease which was difficult to control despite cytotoxic therapy. Antibiotic therapy was reinstituted after Borrelia burgdorferi was detected in the patient’s peripheral blood leukocytes by the polymerase chain reaction, PCR. All serologic, T-cell stimulation, and western blot analyses, however, were negative. The patient’s disease responded to oral ampicillin, p robenecid therapy and concurrent cytotoxic therapy. Subsequent leukocyte PCR testing has been negative for the causative agent of Lyme disease. This case may provide an example of the in vivo immuno-modulatory effects of spirochetes in human autoimmune disease. In addition, this case emphasizes the potential clinical utility of PCR technology in evaluating the persistent sero-negative Lyme disease which may occur in immunocompromised individuals.





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