Septin proteins take bacterial prisoners

Septin proteins take bacterial prisoners

 

A cellular defence against microbial pathogens holds therapeutic potential.

Cellular proteins called septins might play an important part in the human body’s ability to fight off bacterial infections, according to a study.

Septins are found in many organisms, and are best known for building scaffolding to provide structural support during cell division and to rope off parts of the cell. However, most studies of septins, or guanosine-5′-triphosphate (GTP) binding proteins, have been confined to yeast cells. The latest research in human cells suggests that septins build ‘cages’ around bacterial pathogens, immobilizing the harmful microbes and preventing them from invading other healthy cells.

To read more visit:  http://www.nature.com/news/septin-proteins-take-bacterial-prisoners-1.9540





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